« Babble Joins Disney | Main | Why The Bay Area Needs The Bay Lights »

Comments

Lyttleton

A very interesting read. I just finished your most recent book and passed it on to a friend. As a city dweller, I was especially drawn to the discussion of how city life is a boon for creativity and innovation.
What I've always appreciated about your books (and I think I've read all but maybe one) is your consistent optimism and wonder at how technology and interconnectivity improves our lives. It's a very exhilarating contrast to the constant nihilistic storm of commentators both off and online.

Jaredran

While this is all incredibly cool, do you believe that it's making your books better? Ever richer in serendipity and an even longer zoom than you were able to achieve 15 years ago? Or are you simply accessing the same pool of information faster?

Life Insurance Laura

I would think he is able to access a whole new pool of information with key word searches and the information Google is able to assemble. Its really quite astounding when you think about the sheer numbers.

dien thoai di dong

No offense, but if there's a facebook like button, it'll be much easier for me to share.

discount jordan shoes

rabbit hole of the French railway design if I hadn't seen that map in grad school two decades ago. Same goes for the Hayek and the internet history as well. I had enough pre-existing knowledge to know that they belonged in the story, so when something about them got in my sights, I was ready to pounce on it.

4. Very few of the key links came from the traditional approach of reading a work and then following the citations included in the endnotes. The reading was still critical, of course, but the connective branches turned out to lie in the social layer of commentary outside of the work.

5. It’s been said it a thousand times before, by me and many others, but it's worth repeating again: people who think the Web is killing off serendipity are not using it correctly.

6. Finally, this simple, but amazing fact: almost none

Charming Charlie

It should also be said that at every step of the way you're able to filter out leads that would not be productive. Or perhaps that filtration happens as the narrative is being written about the research.

calendar for android

Without his subconscious inspiration, you would've appeared much more attractive, and less Gingrich-esque.

Mccormicktim

> "people who think the Web is killing off serendipity are not using it correctly."

The discovery process you describe in your article is impressive and inspiring -- like your recent book Where Good Ideas Come From, which I read and enjoyed.  However, it is hardly representative of most Web users' access to or use of information.

The serendipity concern is based on what the 99% do, not you: evidence shows that most people use relatively few news sources, rarely switch away from accustomed tools (e.g. their search engine), Twitter posts come largely from 20k or so accounts (cf Yahoo Research "Who Twitters?" study by Wu, Watts, et al), and people increasingly get info from social networks of people who are often like-minded.

To suggest that people articulating the serendipity problem, e.g. Eli Pariser, generally do so because they personally don't know how to use the Web correctly isn't plausible or very generous.  Your readers would be well served by a more fair hearing of the idea and its reasoned proponents.

@mccormicktim

Sparkarch

Serendipity is the subject of the 2008 Darwin College Lecture Series. [http://sms.cam.ac.uk/collection/74]
I think your point 3 is dead on for serendipity. As a concept it rests on the sagacity part of its definition as much as chance. As the boy scouts say "be prepared." You can't be lucky if you don't see opportunity in the stream of chaos around you.

Ugg boots clearance

OMG! How cute is this? I am so enjoying these projects that you are sharing. Nothing else is getting finished because I am too busy making projects!
thank you for sharing!

ugg boots for sale

discovery process you describe in your article is impressive and inspiring -- like your recent book Where Good Ideas Come From, which I read and enjoyed. However, it is hardly representative of most Web users' access to or use of information.

The serendipity concern is based on what the 99% do, not you: evidence shows that most people use relatively few news sources, rarely switch away from accustomed tools (e.g. their search engine), Twitter posts come largely from 20k or so accounts (cf Yahoo Research "Who Twitters?" study by Wu, Watts, et al), and people increasingly get info from social networks of people who are often like-minded.

To suggest that people articulating the serendipity problem, e.g. Eli Pariser, generally do so because they personally don't know how to use the Web correctly isn't

ugg 5815 boots

There are other, more sensible ways to eliminate odors, the first of which is to clean up whatever's causing.

KulaginDanila

Эффектная реклама на радио и в прессе.

quang cao web

And Geneine, if you're going to comment, at least attempt a debatable point, unless you don't have one.

UGG Boots

should add that the responses I'm looking for on Twitter are links to longer discussions, not 140 character micro-essays.)

3. Priming is everything. All these new tools are incredible for making rapid-fire discoveries and associations, but you need a broad background of knowledge to prime you for those discoveries. I'm not sure I would have jumped down that wonderful rabbit hole of the French railway design if I hadn't seen that map in grad school two decades ago. Same goes for the Hayek and the internet history as well. I had enough pre-existing knowledge to know that they belonged in the story, so when something about them got in my sights, I was ready to pounce on it.

4. Very few of the key links came from the traditional approach of reading a work and then following the citations included in the endnotes. The reading was still critical, of course, but the connective branches turned out to lie in the social layer of commentary outside of the work.

5. It’s been said it a thousand times before, by me

UGG Boots

everything. All these new tools are incredible for making rapid-fire discoveries and associations, but you need a broad background of knowledge to prime you for those discoveries. I'm not sure I would have jumped down that wonderful rabbit hole of the French railway design if I hadn't seen that map in grad school two decades ago. Same goes for the Hayek and the internet history as well. I had enough pre-existing knowledge to know that they belonged in the story, so when something about them got in my sights, I was ready to pounce

kirpik bakımı

Twitter posts come largely from 20k or so accounts (cf Yahoo Research "Who Twitters?" study by Wu, Watts, et al

estetik cerrahi

And Geneine, if you're going to comment, at least attempt a debatable point, unless you don't have one.

kurumsal seo

There are other, more sensible ways to eliminate odors, the first of which is to clean up whatever's causing.

ugg 5815 boots

Folks are starting to get medieval on one another. Or maybe gang violence is not what it used to be in southern California.

Samad Aidane

It is great to see your statement about writing-while-still-researching.

I am following this approach right now in my research on what we can learn from latest brain research that we can apply to developing leaders. I stumbled on your book "Mind Wide Open" in the process and, by the way, found the last chapter "conclusion" some of the best writing on brain research I read so far.

Great to see that writing-while-still-researching can be achieved.

Natalija

Hi Stephen,
I saw your TED speech on Where Good Ideas Come From, and I dare to say you got it all wrong. I hope you don't mind hearing opposing thoughts on your "ideas". You missed the whole point, because in all of your speech and blog you never once mentioned the word intuition or gut feeling. Word hunch doesn't do it. The best ideas don't come from thinking or from intellect. They come from Higher consciousness to which we have access by means of intuition. Even better conditions for such great intuitive ideas than in cafeterias are in nature, meditation, temples or anywhere else where it is easy to connect to the Higher Cosciousness.
I suggest you reading this http://thefreepenguin.nl/DavidIckeNewsletters/Don't%20Think%20It%20...%20Know%20It%20-%20David%20Icke%20Website.pdf. Here David Icke explains the difference between thinking and knowing. Also, there are numerous popular science books that can inform you on this, linke Blink by Gladwell, Gut feelings by Gigerenzer (Max-Planck institute)...not to mention all the other books on intuition. Try to open your mind to it and reconsider.

Ed Manlove

A couple more paths that might lead you to where you are going...

A book entitled "Old Man Thunder, father of the bullet train" by Bill Hosokawa

The concept of "designing for informality" as talked about by Adam White and his cohorts at www.groupshot.com

sanusi

thats very good story but you did put the pics

download Mac keylogger

This is my first time i visit here. I found interesting things to many in your blog, mostly to the debate.

The comments to this entry are closed.

My Photo

SBJ via Twitter

    follow me on Twitter

    The Basics

    • I'm a father of three boys, husband of one wife, and author of eight books, and co-founder of three web sites. We spend most of the year in Marin County, California though I'm on the road a lot giving talks. (You can see the full story here.) Personal correspondence should go to sbeej68 at gmail dot com. If you're interested in having me speak at an event, drop a line to Wesley Neff at the Leigh Bureau (WesN at Leighbureau dot com.)

    My Books

    • : Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation

      Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation
      An exploration of environments that lead to breakthrough innovation, in science, technology, business, and the arts. I conceived it as the closing book in a trilogy on innovative thinking, after Ghost Map and Invention. But in a way, it completes an investigation that runs through all the books. Sold more copies in hardcover than anything else I've written.

    • : The Invention of Air

      The Invention of Air
      The story of the British radical chemist Joseph Priestley, who ended up having a Zelig-like role in the American Revolution. My version of a founding fathers book, and a reminder that most of the Enlightenment was driven by open source ideals.

    • : The Ghost Map

      The Ghost Map
      The latest: the story of a terrifying outbreak of cholera in 1854 London 1854 that ended up changing the world. An idea book wrapped around a page-turner. I like to think of it as a sequel to Emergence if Emergence had been a disease thriller. You can see a trailer for the book here.

    • : Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter

      Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter
      The title says it all. This one sparked a slightly insane international conversation about the state of pop culture -- and particularly games. There were more than a few dissenters, but the response was more positive than I had expected. And it got me on The Daily Show, which made it all worthwhile.

    • : Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life

      Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life
      My first best-seller, and the only book I've written in which I appear as a recurring character, subjecting myself to a battery of humiliating brain scans. The last chapter on Freud and the neuroscientific model of the mind is one of my personal favorites.

    • : Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software

      Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software
      The story of bottom-up intelligence, from slime mold to Slashdot. Probably the most critically well-received all my books, and the one that has influenced the most eclectic mix of fields: political campaigns, web business models, urban planning, the war on terror.

    • : Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate

      Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate
      My first. The book I wrote instead of finishing my dissertation. Still in print almost a decade later, and still relevant, I think. But I haven't read it in a while, so who knows what's in there!

    Blog powered by Typepad