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Comments

Andyparsons

Congrats to you, John, Corey and the team. Looking forward to watching a great idea blossom there!

Scottneumyer

LOVE this idea and loving the site so far. The only thing we need to be able to do is import/find friends somehow as there doesn't appear to be that ability just yet.

Brendannh

Would be good if you could ad clips from books, actual books... rather than just ebooks.

Jules Ferdinand

Congratulations! I am one of those "annotating chipmunks" too. I wait with great excitement to see the rapid expansion of this project.

Toddmgreen

Looks great - congrats on the launch.

I read Kevin Kelly's article on the future of books this morning, and this evening I'm here using a service similar to what he described!

Here's the article link: http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2011/04/what_books_will.php

Mannr89

Ever since reading 'where good ideas come from', I've started keeping a commonplace category in my blog. The need to re-enter in a Kindle highlight drove me to never actually adopting the practice, however valuable I saw it. I think with your Findings app, it's Kindle integration is brilliant and will be the main reason I use it because I can so easily import something that I already do tonnes of.

It's a good idea and I hope this takes off.

I'm using Chrome and have dragged the Findings bookmarklet into my bar however clicking it at the logged in Kindle link of my highlights doesn't seem to bring any of my highlights over.

Melissa

As Corey's sister, I know how hard everyone has been working on the site. Congrats on the launch!

twitter.com/VinceKuraitis

Steven,

A few weeks ago I stumbled across your methods of writing (collecting, organizing through DEVONThink, start writing to connect islands) and found it very intuitive and fitting my style. I am adapting your approach to write my own book primarily using Evernote and Scrivener for Windows. This method still lacks the AI functionality of DEVONThink but is still sooooo much better than the traditional way of starting with a clean sheet of paper.

I would be glad to contribute to Findings... hope you will create a way to export from Evernote to Findings. For now, not practical to duplicate putting quotes in two places.

Vince

Mark Crane

I've been doing this with blogger for about a decade, but it's a huge mess that is combined with bookmarks as well. This tool looks like a really useful, focused way to collect these snippets. The fact that your bookmarklet is on the front page bodes well. As blogger layers on design elements and submenus of settings, this is a breath of fresh, focused air.

stephan schulz

this is a great tool. i wrote a little apple script back in my university days that helped me collect quotes from different websites and pdfs. It always found it a pain to have to separately copy the text, the urls, the title ...
http://maybevideodoes.de/howto/mario.html

I am looking forward to using this new tool of yours.

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There are other, more sensible ways to eliminate odors, the first of which is to clean up whatever's causing.

Philadelphia House

Collaboration with john will have greater results, congrats

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    The Basics

    • I'm a father of three boys, husband of one wife, and author of eight books, and co-founder of three web sites. We spend most of the year in Marin County, California though I'm on the road a lot giving talks. (You can see the full story here.) Personal correspondence should go to sbeej68 at gmail dot com. If you're interested in having me speak at an event, drop a line to Wesley Neff at the Leigh Bureau (WesN at Leighbureau dot com.)

    My Books

    • : Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation

      Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation
      An exploration of environments that lead to breakthrough innovation, in science, technology, business, and the arts. I conceived it as the closing book in a trilogy on innovative thinking, after Ghost Map and Invention. But in a way, it completes an investigation that runs through all the books. Sold more copies in hardcover than anything else I've written.

    • : The Invention of Air

      The Invention of Air
      The story of the British radical chemist Joseph Priestley, who ended up having a Zelig-like role in the American Revolution. My version of a founding fathers book, and a reminder that most of the Enlightenment was driven by open source ideals.

    • : The Ghost Map

      The Ghost Map
      The latest: the story of a terrifying outbreak of cholera in 1854 London 1854 that ended up changing the world. An idea book wrapped around a page-turner. I like to think of it as a sequel to Emergence if Emergence had been a disease thriller. You can see a trailer for the book here.

    • : Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter

      Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter
      The title says it all. This one sparked a slightly insane international conversation about the state of pop culture -- and particularly games. There were more than a few dissenters, but the response was more positive than I had expected. And it got me on The Daily Show, which made it all worthwhile.

    • : Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life

      Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life
      My first best-seller, and the only book I've written in which I appear as a recurring character, subjecting myself to a battery of humiliating brain scans. The last chapter on Freud and the neuroscientific model of the mind is one of my personal favorites.

    • : Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software

      Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software
      The story of bottom-up intelligence, from slime mold to Slashdot. Probably the most critically well-received all my books, and the one that has influenced the most eclectic mix of fields: political campaigns, web business models, urban planning, the war on terror.

    • : Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate

      Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate
      My first. The book I wrote instead of finishing my dissertation. Still in print almost a decade later, and still relevant, I think. But I haven't read it in a while, so who knows what's in there!

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