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Comments

Joe Holmes

Your blog was recommended to me by a friend, and reading this entry first, I thought your new book sounded intriguing. I put it in my mental Browse In Bookstore and Consider Buying list. Then I reached the part where you mention your previous book, Ghost Map, which I read last year, and your new book immediately bumped up to Must Buy Soon. Ghost Map was superb.

Augusto Pinaud

Dear Steve, I hope you release a Kindle version. Until then I will not pre-order.

KB

Would love to have you come speak in London in November if you have any dates free. We have a gathering of people in a wonderful old venue in Clerkenwell thinking about the connections between technology and philosophy, and this would be a perfect fit if you'd be up for it. Decent honorarium and good profile of the book to a great demographic... Would love to have you!

Norm DeValliere

Sounds intriguing, I look forward to reading it.

Ted Braun

I anxiously await this book. I am in the middle of thinking about where change happens in the real estate business. I am sure that, as you have with your other books, you will sharpen my thinking.

http://qedrealestate.wordpress.com/2010/06/09/ikea-for-real-estate/

Giuseppe Lucido

Hi Steve,
great to hear we'll have to wait only a few more months. I just can't wait to read it.
Any chance your tour will hit Italy as well? If not, think about planning Milan. We'll be very happy to host you again for a special edition of Meet the Media Guru.
Cheers,
Giuseppe

David Lipscomb

Can't wait for this one, Steven. I happen to know this idea's been percolating for something like 15 years. BTW, if you haven't seen it yet, you must check out the maps created by Eric Fischer on Flickr: he used Flickr geotagging data to create heatmaps of where locals vs. tourists took photos in top cities. I immediately thought of you when I saw them.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/walkingsf/sets/72157624209158632/detail/

Nita29MASSEY

People deserve very good life time and lowest-rate-loans.com or car loan would make it much better. Because freedom is grounded on money state.

glory

speaking of which, you might find cosma shalizi's broadside against (naive) bayesian-ism interesting... from whence bad ideas come (and how they might be corrected ;)

http://bactra.org/weblog/664.html

cheers!

jack

BTW, if you haven't seen it yet, you must check out the maps created by Eric Fischer on Flickr: http://www.wxshenzhou.com/ wind generatorshe used Flickr geotagging data to create heatmaps of where locals vs. tourists took photos in top cities. I immediately thought of you when I saw them.

Jim Takchess

This is a timely and interesting topic which I look forward to reading about. I was thinking this was the possible subject of Gladwell's next book.

A great book that looks at causes of invention/innovation during the industrial revolution is found here.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7863046-the-most-powerful-idea-in-the-world

Jordan 13

Business? That's very simple---- it's other people's money. Very humor, also very reasonable!Post by Jordan 13

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What a pity I miss seeing all those gorgeous knits! Thanks for sharing the photos.

C. Krahnke

You go, Girl!

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Daniel L. Burnstein

Love your TED talk about on the origin of great ideas. I do have a question though. If you have some great ideas to start with, what do you do with them if, like me, you're outside the academia and there exist no networks that welcome ideas that are not only innovative but also challenge established concepts?

Miroslav Miskovic

Scientific-technological revolution and the historical consciousness.

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I caught your video which led me to search for your book and find this blog, I'm looking forward to reading it here in Canada.

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Dear Steve, I hope you release a Kindle version. Until then I will not pre-order.

twitter.com/762x51

Read your WSJ article last week. Interesting stuff, but I have bad news. I now intend to steal this book, rather than pay for it. After all, it could be a "part on the table" pertinent to my understanding of some undisclosed subject matter. Unless I misread the article, it seems you're not terribly fond of property rights. Any distinction asserting the importance of copyright - which, bear in mind, has an immeasurably lower per-development investment level on the aggregate - would seem tremendously disingenuous.

Further, I suppose your argument might hold water in an exclusively trade-secret regime, but the limited monopoly allowed by patent is intended to encourage not only investment but _disclosure_, thus getting new technologies published, for the public, sooner than if an inventor was provided no rights in his development. The cobbling and adjacent moves do occur, just fine, as it is.

Finally, don't read too much into the "open" behavior of a few big actors. The release of certain IP into the public domain is part public relations, part financial strategy (maintenance fees are expensive). What would be far more elucidating would be to see what percentage of filings they have/are actually releasing, as well as an overview of their recent offensive and defensive litigation behavior. Judging by the number of IP attorneys P&G keeps around, I have a sneaking suspicion they're not leading the charge to eradicate rights to exclude or remedies against infringers. But it does make for great media.

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Boris Shakhnovich

Great talk by someone who has clearly thought about the importance of bringing together people from diverse backgrounds to create something novel. How do you do that in an efficient manner in the 21st century? You create a virtual coffee-shop where you bring together the top thinkers of the time. We did that at http://www.iamscientist.com/people. Now we have to convince the corporations, universities, medical research foundations and governments that their next life-altering discovery or product will come from engaging the network. Check out http://www.iamscientist.com/rfas/home

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My Photo
I'm a father of three boys, husband of one wife, and author of nine books, host of one television series, and co-founder of three web sites. We split our time between Brooklyn, NY and Marin County, CA. Personal correspondence should go to sbeej68 at gmail dot com. If you're interested in having me speak at an event, drop a line to Wesley Neff at the Leigh Bureau (WesN at Leighbureau dot com.)

My Books

  • Steven Johnson: How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World

    Steven Johnson: How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World
    A history of innovation accompanied by a 6-part TV series on PBS and the BBC, this was the first of my books to crack the top 5 on the NY Times bestseller list. Appropriately for a book that celebrates diverse networks, this was the most collaborative of any of my books. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • Steven Johnson: Future Perfect: The Case For Progress In A Networked Age

    Steven Johnson: Future Perfect: The Case For Progress In A Networked Age
    My first book-length attempt to organize my writings about emergence and networks into something resembling a political philosophy, which I called Peer Progressivism. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation

    Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation
    An exploration of environments that lead to breakthrough innovation, in science, technology, business, and the arts. I conceived it as the closing book in a trilogy on innovative thinking, after Ghost Map and Invention. But in a way, it completes an investigation that runs through all the books, and laid the groundwork for How We Got To Now. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : The Invention of Air

    The Invention of Air
    The story of the British radical chemist Joseph Priestley, who ended up having a Zelig-like role in the American Revolution. My version of a founding fathers book, and a reminder that most of the Enlightenment was driven by open source ideals. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : The Ghost Map

    The Ghost Map
    The story of a terrifying outbreak of cholera in 1854 London 1854 that ended up changing the world. An idea book wrapped around a page-turner. I like to think of it as a sequel to Emergence if Emergence had been a disease thriller. You can see a trailer for the book here. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter

    Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter
    The title says it all. This one sparked a slightly insane international conversation about the state of pop culture -- and particularly games. There were more than a few dissenters, but the response was more positive than I had expected. And it got me on The Daily Show, which made it all worthwhile. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life

    Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life
    My first best-seller, and the only book I've written in which I appear as a recurring character, subjecting myself to a battery of humiliating brain scans. The last chapter on Freud and the neuroscientific model of the mind is one of my personal favorites. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software

    Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software
    The story of bottom-up intelligence, from slime mold to Slashdot. Most of my books sold more copies than this one, but Emergence has influenced the most eclectic mix of fields: political campaigns, web business models, urban planning, the war on terror. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate

    Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate
    My first. The book I wrote instead of finishing my dissertation, predicting the growing cultural significance of interface and information design. Still relevant, I think. But I haven't read it in a while, so who knows what's in there! (Available from IndieBound here.)

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