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Scott Yates

Always amazing how the Wall St. Journal can even scoop people on their own blog.

I'm guessing that was part of your plan. Your blog is great, but I suspect a few more people read the WSJ.

Anyway, great news! Congratulations to you and the whole team.

Letwits

Congrats, but, have you watched CNN lately, i.e., in the last five years? Be careful your IQ doesn't go down five points every month you're in biz with them.

Peter Herr

Congrats on your successes with outside.in. keep on chuggin! we are rooting for u.

i started reading the few pages (that amazon lets) me of your book "Everything is good is bad for you". I had to laugh. Im from lancaster county (and im not amish! im tired of the jokes!!!) and i can recall ever since i can remember, we would drive down millersville road right past APBA and i always wondered what in the heck that building was... what do they do there?? My mothers answer "they make board games" simply would not suffice.

My best memories of that intersection are from Charlestown park (across the street) where I would play pick up basketball during my HS years. Don't get me started (I could talk all day about my incredible learning experiences at that park and all the interesting people I met).

Amazon won't let me continue to read on, so I just might have to pick up your book. Again- best of luck with outside.in. i already searched my hometown and found a great article.

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Have such respect for partners and investors, news organizations for us is clearly a big problem. Specifically, this is a platform we build confidence in outside.in, but perhaps more importantly, it is a and hyperlocal, as well as news, many of our eco-system model has been advocated by many years. I have been impressed with the huge aircraft KC Estenson and the CNN.com team through the process, they really have what we are trying to do a great breath, and rich experience, we have begun to benefit from it. I think it must be in their company's DNA - after all, they said 30 years ago, business news and information aggregation in the original book.

Nat Irvin

Steven,

I am currently reading Ghost Map! It is an absolutely wonderful book. I have read Emergence and Everything...and heard several of your talks. Thanks for sharing your wonderful insights with others. I hate it when your books end.

Nat Irvin

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SBJ via Twitter

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    The Basics

    • I'm a father of three boys, husband of one wife, and author of eight books, and co-founder of three web sites. We spend most of the year in Marin County, California though I'm on the road a lot giving talks. (You can see the full story here.) Personal correspondence should go to sbeej68 at gmail dot com. If you're interested in having me speak at an event, drop a line to Wesley Neff at the Leigh Bureau (WesN at Leighbureau dot com.)

    My Books

    • : Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation

      Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation
      An exploration of environments that lead to breakthrough innovation, in science, technology, business, and the arts. I conceived it as the closing book in a trilogy on innovative thinking, after Ghost Map and Invention. But in a way, it completes an investigation that runs through all the books. Sold more copies in hardcover than anything else I've written.

    • : The Invention of Air

      The Invention of Air
      The story of the British radical chemist Joseph Priestley, who ended up having a Zelig-like role in the American Revolution. My version of a founding fathers book, and a reminder that most of the Enlightenment was driven by open source ideals.

    • : The Ghost Map

      The Ghost Map
      The latest: the story of a terrifying outbreak of cholera in 1854 London 1854 that ended up changing the world. An idea book wrapped around a page-turner. I like to think of it as a sequel to Emergence if Emergence had been a disease thriller. You can see a trailer for the book here.

    • : Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter

      Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter
      The title says it all. This one sparked a slightly insane international conversation about the state of pop culture -- and particularly games. There were more than a few dissenters, but the response was more positive than I had expected. And it got me on The Daily Show, which made it all worthwhile.

    • : Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life

      Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life
      My first best-seller, and the only book I've written in which I appear as a recurring character, subjecting myself to a battery of humiliating brain scans. The last chapter on Freud and the neuroscientific model of the mind is one of my personal favorites.

    • : Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software

      Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software
      The story of bottom-up intelligence, from slime mold to Slashdot. Probably the most critically well-received all my books, and the one that has influenced the most eclectic mix of fields: political campaigns, web business models, urban planning, the war on terror.

    • : Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate

      Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate
      My first. The book I wrote instead of finishing my dissertation. Still in print almost a decade later, and still relevant, I think. But I haven't read it in a while, so who knows what's in there!

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