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Matteo

Hi Steven,

I think this will change positively quite quickly, again with the help of technologies _for_ communication. Just like twitter empowers the audience with a backchannel, so will small displays embedded in eyeglasses, or other tools which will provide visible feedback to the speaker, possibly transparently to the auditorium.

Politicians in particular are already doing it, with visual clues scrapped on signs by staff members on the back of the room, tips through the earphone, or on the podium screen.

Speakers that care about keeping the pulse of the crowd will have to look for tools that go beyond jokes (that people probably don't even listen to if they are busy accumulating their emotional state on a twitter stream).

DaveP

Glad you at least "think it has its quirks and points where it fails outright" - I've seen it turn into an electronic stoning of the person onstage (it wasn't me, so this is not a personal trauma). Worst is the projection onscreen behind a speaker of the backchannel. I find this the least useful development in "community" technology - a negation of the power and subtlety of a personal encounter and the atrophy of the attention and courtesy that it requires.

Matteo predicts a tehnological fix? If "people probably don't even listen to [the jokes] if they are busy accumulating their emotional state on a twitter stream" what makes you think they are listening to any of the rest of it? We need new tools to deal with plain rudeness? The speaker now has to split his/her own attention to monitor the instantaneous derision level?

And someone like you, Steven, travels and prepares only to meet this smart(ass) mob? I hope we can do better as a technological and social species.

Peter

I like the Word Suicide 3-16-08
Peter Macdonald 465 Packersfalls rd Lee NH 03824 603-659-6217 [email protected]
I first want to apologize I have been using the wrong date on my past few letters.
So many of the right people in the right gov. agencies read my letters yet they do nothing. These so called right officials are so set on believing that I am a nut and paranoid, that they ignore what I write and condemn me. I have serious disabilities that I received while serving in the U.S. Marine Corps. The NH governor and Judges have so violated the law that using the news media to strip a disabled Veteran of any public dignity, so the public has stereotyped me crazy. Yes you are probably right. I do see the world differently than others. Some thirty years after receiving a head injury in the MC, I still have no memory of my child hood. I broke my back during one Vietnam offensive and was blown off a runway and lost most of my hearing in both ears during another offensive. I learned to love the United States of America because I lived in some of the dirtiest, crude and deadliest conditions before I have any memory of seeing the U.S. I came back to the “World” (US) to a place that I do not belong. Never have I violated the law on purpose. I have volunteered every day to help others just the make the U.S. a better place. I owe this to those that never returned alive.
A criminal is someone whom violates the law with intent to harm others. Judge Peter Fauver did just that. The NH Supreme court is so biased that it refused to hear a case presented by a high school drop out. Fauver made me and attorney to represent a Madbury NH family for a zoning issue because Fauver thought it would allow him to screw this family to benefit the selectmen’s criminal acts. I proved the case beyond any doubt and Fauver ignored the law to harm others. A judge is not above the opinion of the people or the law. The State and local police under the direction of the NH governor and the Sheriff’s dept harass my family at work and home to cover up crimes committed by a judge. For the system to allow a U.S. congresswoman (Shea-Porter) to use her political powers to medically harm me is beyond any belief. For the Inspector General of the NH Veteran’s admin in Manchester. NH to stop my VA medical for service injuries received as a U.S. Marine (two of the three Combat related) can not be tolerated. I write these letters because it is every U.S. citizen’s responsibility to correct the wrongs in government. I may be crazy to put my live on the line for our country. That would make every U.S. military personal crazy also. The right people that do nothing but sit idle and allow the NH Judges and government official to harm a disabled veteran are not bad people. These right people are just believing what powerful people tell them. I tell every news paper in the U.S. to print my letter with a disclaimer and allow me to suffer the consequences. The unedited opinion of the people is the most important part of the news media’s ethical responsibility. I think as a 100% disabled U.S. Marine I have earned the right to have this letter printed across the U.S. unedited. “truth is a powerful weapon”
Peter Macdonald Sgt USMC Semper Fi

Mark Bauerlein

I enjoyed your discussion with Jenkins at SXSW, Steven (rendered at http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=17829), but I notice he didn't answer your question about any research demonstrating "empirical measures of those new skills"--that is, the "new literacies" Jenkins highlighted.

Kieran Wild

Off topic,

There is a good review of your book The Ghost Map on the BBC Radio 4 - A Good Read
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/arts/agoodread.shtml

Bests,

Kieran

Peter

Interesting post. In the light of Barack Obama's recent speech on race, it is worth noting one major difference between most black and most white religious gatherings in the USA: black congregations respond vocally (and sometimes also physically) throughout a minister's sermon -- they affirm, they laugh, they applaud, they clap hands with one another, they even stand up and dance. In your terms, this means that both the speaker and the congregation itself get continuous and immediate feedback on the room tone as the sermon proceeds.

Jeff

I would assume that as feedback like this becomes more sophisticated speakers will have to develop a new way of speaking, one that incorporates "pauses" while they read and then adjust to that feedback.

In addition, as part of the development of these social channels it would be nice if we could develop a loop, one where audience members can both take credit and be accountable for their comments (how would the balance of power shift if every tweeter's live image was projected on the stage screen as they posted their comment -g). I see the cloak of invisibility allowing for a magnified reaction to speakers, analogous to blog and forum anonymous flames. And what's the value of those to anyone?

Eileen

If everybody is twittering, is anybody listening?

Ann DeMarle

This post reminds of the Abenaki storyteller, Gray Wolf, from Vermont. He "taught" the audience to respond at the outset of his story. We were instructed that in Abenaki storytelling, when a storyteller paused, the audience was to vocalize a word akin to "aya" to which the storyteller would respond in turn. It was in this way that the storyteller and the audience became a community each with a role and a feedback loop in the communication that kept the story living.

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that using the news media to strip a disabled Veteran of any public dignity, so the public has stereotyped me crazy. Yes you are probably right. I do see the world differently than others. Some thirty years after receiving a head injury in the MC, I still have no memory of my child hood. I broke my back during one Vietnam offensive and was blown off a runway and lost most of my hearing in both ears during
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Jordan 5

God is the ultimate audience who will ultimately judge our message.

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I have the same opinion I don't know enough about this but my sister told me she could watch the interview and she says that was really interesting because she told me that was related to some important twitter tools, I trust her because she has an incredible sense of those topics.

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