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Ricardo de Castro Barbosa

I came from NY today, arriving in S.Paulo this morning. I had the honor of travelling with Steven. Hope you all have the opportunity to see him at Canal Livre (I will !)

Mari

Steven! Just came from Campus Party, @ São Paulo... Loved your lecture! Just wanted to say that Interface Culture saved my graduate work @ college! THANK YOU! Hope you like Brasil ;)

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chris sivori

Maybe long form reading is in decline due mostly to the weakness of reading things on the computer. This is one reason I'm excited about reflected light displays like eInk (used in the Kindle). I think if we can have a better way to read things digitally the long form will become more popular.

Yellowhandman

Your argument is based on quantity, but ignores quality. Clearly, not all reading is equally valuable, and my concern is more that today's youth may not be reading sufficiently stimulating things. A diet of friends' blogs and entertainment websites simply creates a feedback loop.

Comments (6)

Fuck You in hell.

charlie

Heh, seems like we were thinking the same thing.

I just read this post (03mar08), but have been thinking about this topic for a while and summed it up in a recent post:

http://cognections.typepad.com/lifeblog/2008/02/were-moving-int.html

nachbarin

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Davis Teippe

Steven: How could you misspell Dana Gioia's name several times in your column when you linked to the press release which spelled it properly?

It's unfortunate that we choose to apply severely critical judgment to a writer's thoughts when s/he cannot be bothered to spell properly, but that is what we do.

Gioia or Giola, the choice is your's Mr. Johnson.

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David Boese

Hi Steven
I just finished reading your book ""Mind Wide Open" and really learned a lot. I have been interested in how the brain works for sometime now and have come up with my own ideas. I don't give myself credit for anything that comes out of my brain, because I believe the thought originated somewhere else. My idea of this brought me to have a saying---"My Brain has a Mind of it's Own."
If you ever think of writing another book about this subject, I will give you permission to use this phrase as a "Title." I have read many authors who have written sequels with just a twist of what they have already written and you may want to do the same. On the other hand with the research you have done on the subject of the brain, you may have loads of new information. I would like to write a book, but it's not likely to happen as I'm 72 and in poor health, having survived 7 heart attacks. I look forward to your next book.

David Boese

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Flug Australien

Steven, I really enjoy your nice written posts. To be critically on this one I just have to agree with chris sivori.

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Marc Prensky is acknowledged to have coined the term digital native in his work Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants published in 2001. In his seminal article, he assigns it to a new breed of student entering educational establishments.[1] The term draws an analogy to a country's natives, for whom the local religion, language, and folkways are natural and indigenous, compared with immigrants to a country who often are expected to adapt and assimilate to their newly adopted home. Prensky refers to accents employed by digital immigrants, such as printing documents rather than commenting on screen or printing out emails to save in hard copy form. Digital immigrants are said to have a "thick accent" when operating in the digital world in distinctly pre-digital ways, for instance, calling someone on the telephone to ask if they have received a sent e-mail. A digital native might refer to their new "camera"; a digital immigrant might refer to their new "digital camera".

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With so many online videos for almost every topic you can think of, reading is becoming less and less obsolete. I blame the web.

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You can't say that reading is declining after all we also are reading from the computer .

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I think proper reading is what you done from book and not computer. I fully agree with the writer and this is very bad that literacy is again at declining stage. Interesting article!

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This story was so real that these "characters" gave me great insight and a lot to ponder.

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I just finished reading your book ""Mind Wide Open" and really learned a lot. I have been interested in how the brain works for sometime now and have come up with my own ideas. I don't give myself credit for anything that comes out of my brain, because I believe the thought originated somewhere else. My idea of this brought me to have a saying---"My Brain has a Mind of it's Own."
If you ever think of writing another book about this subject, I will give you permission to use this phrase as a "Title." I have read many authors who have written sequels with just a twist of what they have already written and you may want to do the same. On the other hand with the research you have done on the subject of the brain, you may have loads of new information. I would like to write a book, but it's not likely to happen as I'm 72 and in poor health, having survived 7 heart attacks. I look forward to your next book.
arc Prensky is acknowledged to have coined the term digital native in his work Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants published in 2001. In his seminal article, he assigns it to a new breed of student entering educational establishments.[1] The term draws an analogy to a country's natives, for whom the local religion, language, and folkways are natural and indigenous, compared with immigrants to a country who often are expected to adapt and assimilate to their newly adopted home. Prensky refers to accents employed by digital immigrants, such as printing documents rather than commenting on screen or printing out emails to save in hard copy form. Digital immigrants are said to have a "thick accent" when operating in the digital world in distinctly pre-digital ways, for instance, calling someone on the telephone to ask if they have received a sent e-mail. A digital native might refer to their new "camera"; a digital immigrant might refer to their new "digital camera"

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I'm a father of three boys, husband of one wife, and author of nine books, host of one television series, and co-founder of three web sites. We split our time between Brooklyn, NY and Marin County, CA. Personal correspondence should go to sbeej68 at gmail dot com. If you're interested in having me speak at an event, drop a line to Wesley Neff at the Leigh Bureau (WesN at Leighbureau dot com.)

My Books

  • Steven Johnson: How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World

    Steven Johnson: How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World
    A history of innovation accompanied by a 6-part TV series on PBS and the BBC, this was the first of my books to crack the top 5 on the NY Times bestseller list. Appropriately for a book that celebrates diverse networks, this was the most collaborative of any of my books. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • Steven Johnson: Future Perfect: The Case For Progress In A Networked Age

    Steven Johnson: Future Perfect: The Case For Progress In A Networked Age
    My first book-length attempt to organize my writings about emergence and networks into something resembling a political philosophy, which I called Peer Progressivism. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation

    Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation
    An exploration of environments that lead to breakthrough innovation, in science, technology, business, and the arts. I conceived it as the closing book in a trilogy on innovative thinking, after Ghost Map and Invention. But in a way, it completes an investigation that runs through all the books, and laid the groundwork for How We Got To Now. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : The Invention of Air

    The Invention of Air
    The story of the British radical chemist Joseph Priestley, who ended up having a Zelig-like role in the American Revolution. My version of a founding fathers book, and a reminder that most of the Enlightenment was driven by open source ideals. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : The Ghost Map

    The Ghost Map
    The story of a terrifying outbreak of cholera in 1854 London 1854 that ended up changing the world. An idea book wrapped around a page-turner. I like to think of it as a sequel to Emergence if Emergence had been a disease thriller. You can see a trailer for the book here. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter

    Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter
    The title says it all. This one sparked a slightly insane international conversation about the state of pop culture -- and particularly games. There were more than a few dissenters, but the response was more positive than I had expected. And it got me on The Daily Show, which made it all worthwhile. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life

    Mind Wide Open : Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life
    My first best-seller, and the only book I've written in which I appear as a recurring character, subjecting myself to a battery of humiliating brain scans. The last chapter on Freud and the neuroscientific model of the mind is one of my personal favorites. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software

    Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software
    The story of bottom-up intelligence, from slime mold to Slashdot. Most of my books sold more copies than this one, but Emergence has influenced the most eclectic mix of fields: political campaigns, web business models, urban planning, the war on terror. (Available from IndieBound here.)

  • : Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate

    Interface Culture : How New Technology Transforms the Way We Create and Communicate
    My first. The book I wrote instead of finishing my dissertation, predicting the growing cultural significance of interface and information design. Still relevant, I think. But I haven't read it in a while, so who knows what's in there! (Available from IndieBound here.)

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