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Kurt

A quick note to correct your characterization of "Charles & Ray Eames" as the "Eames Brothers." Ray-Bernice Alexandra Kaiser Eames was the wife of Charles Eames, not his brother.

Steven V.  in Atlanta

Good article. I'm looking forward to Spore, and agree about games' potential in education.

manual trackback: http://steven.vorefamily.net/2006/10/everythings-connected-if-you-look-far.html

Steven V.  in Atlanta

Good article. I'm looking forward to Spore, and agree about games' potential in education.

manual trackback: http://steven.vorefamily.net/2006/10/everythings-connected-if-you-look-far.html

peterme

Huh. Fact-checking and other claim-checking seems to be off.

Not only were the Eames pair a husband-and-wife (not brothers) (perhaps most delightfully photographed here:
http://www.loc.gov/loc/lcib/9905/images/eames_11.jpg ), it's debatable that Will Wright is more "famous and critically acclaimed" than Shigeru Miyamoto of Mario and Zelda fame.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shigeru_Miyamoto

Steven Johnson

Peter, in the U.S. at least, there's no comparison between Wright and Miyamoto. They're not even in the same league. I think they're both geniuses, of course, but there have been way more profiles and critical evaluations of Wright's work in the mainstream press here... And Wright has about 100,000 more Google hits than Miyamoto has...

As for the Eames "brothers" -- I already plead guilty to that one.

Kevin Kelly

Steven,

Wonderful piece, wonderful coingage. I think you got it right; the zoom is indeed the new perspective, the new new frame. Something to conjur with. I can't prove it, but I think "bullet time" also fits into here.

And you also encapsulate the Long Now in a way very few have managed.

andrew

Hi Steven,

The Long Zoom is the best game preview I've ever read. It's also the best case I've heard from someone that this emerging entertainment medium can also be considered an art form.

On a somewhat insignifigant side note, the opening of Fight Club had an automatic pistol, not a revolver, in his mouth.

But seriously, that was an amazing article.

len

Quick question about the article - what's a "Hegelian reward", and why is a spaceship an example? Google doesn't seem to know.

There's something incredibly exciting about the idea of being given/obtaining a spaceship when they're not common. I remember reading Arthur C Clarke's The City and The Stars, and finding the whole concept of the post-apocalyptic (not really, but you understand) characters digging a fully operational spaceship from the desert sands, then taking off for the far reaches of the universe. Perhaps because it magically expands your sphere of experience exponentially.

Susan

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Michael Locker MD

Cool insight.

Michael Locker MD

Christian carter

in the U.S. at least, there's no comparison between Wright and Miyamoto. They're not even in the same league. I think they're both geniuses, of course, but there have been way more profiles and critical evaluations of Wright's work in the mainstream press here...
Website:http://www.qqcc.info/sitemap.htm

Susan

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Brian O' Hanlon

Might be interesting for some folks here:

http://www.cooperationcommons.com/cooperation-commons/remember-lateral-thinking

Keep up writing steven.

Brian O' Hanlon.

Tim Price-Walker

Stephen, I would be really keen to hear your views on game authoring as opposed to game playing as an means of education - particularly in encouraging students to improve their literacy through narrative writing through making their own games of different genres. I have read your excellent book "Everything bad is good for you" and intrigued by many of the points you raise about the benefits of games (telescoping etc) I am a project manager at a small educational publisher in Oxford which has a game authoring tool in early adopter phase - called 'MissionMaker'. Students have a range of 3D assets to develop their own game construct - they control economies, character, interactions, props and settings. What are your views on this?

jujuspapa

How does long zoom and fractals complement one another?

I am deeply interested in the fractal analysis of Jackson Pollock. So, this notion of Long Zoom gets me interested all over again...

BTW, one of my favorite books to 'read' to my 2 year old son is Zoom.

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